phnom penh © 2012 . All rights reserved.

Phnom Penh

I arrived in the capital city of Cambodia just after an afternoon downpour. Again, I’m grateful since it brings the temperature down a few degrees! A $7 US tuk-tuk ride got me to my hotel, The Blue Lime. A few streets were flooded but we made it. I’m on the fifth floor (no lift!) with a bird’s eye view of the neighborhood.

 

Phnom Penh is on the list of up-and-coming Asian capitals. You can see progress, mostly catering toward tourism. There are lots of skyscrapers going up in the distance, but as is the case of every city I have seen on this trip, they sit unfinished. There do seem to be lots of great restaurants here and more thriving businesses.

I would say this is a typical street corner in Phnom Penh. There are better and there are worse but this is basically what you see everywhere. The people of Cambodia were only allowed back in the city after the Vietnamese liberated Phnom Penh from the Khmer Rouge in 1979, so they are still in a rebuilding phase really.

Happy Hour at the Foreign Correspondents Club.

The FCC is a classic place with 2 levels, good food, views and a cool breeze.

Wat Botum

 

King Jayavarman VII, possibly the most popular Khmer king of all time.

 

 

Wat Botum

 

The National Museum – very interesting and only $3. But they don’t allow photography so no pretty pictures of ancient artifacts! They had a great exhibit featuring animation of what life at Angkor Wat was like in its heyday. I think it rivals the Roman empire!

The wats around town are like an oasis. Even from the outside, beautiful. On the inside of the wall they are a shady spot to rest for a minute, sip some water, check your guidebook, and safely get your bearings away from the pestering tuk-tuk and moto drivers on the street.

Another delicious lunch. This time shrimp and mango spring rolls.

I’m not embarrassed to admit that after walking around for a couple hours, sweating like crazy, it’s nice to hit the sports pubs for a cold draft and some game highlights.

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  1. Most of the trip I have worn a pair of Teva Olowahu flipflops. They have multiple straps so they stay on better than regular flipflops. I also have a pair of lightweight New Balance sneakers with Superfeet insoles for any serious trekking.

  2. Brian Hannah

    What are you doing for footwear?